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Battle of Gallipoli: notes

Sub-series consists of printed personal note from Major-General Aylmer Hunter-Weston, British Army transcribed signals from the first day of Battle of Gallipoli, and correspondence between the Imperial War Museum and Colum Kenny regarding the transcribed signals and recruitment advertisements (see sub-series C2/1/1/2). Some of the signals are signed 'J Murphy' who Colum Kenny suggested may have been Jack (John) Murphy, brother of Annette Kenny (née Murphy), Kevin J Kenny's wife. This could possibly explain how the signals came to form part of the collection.

Belfast Boycott

Notes and leaflet relating to the ‘Belfast Boycott’. Dáil Éireann introduced this boycott in September 1920 in response to rioting in Derry and Belfast and discrimination against the Catholic community in Northern Ireland. It would appear from the items in this sub-series that Kevin J Kenny was concerned with ensuring that the activities of his business did not go against the boycott.

British Army recruitment advertising

Letters, newspaper cuttings and published material relating to the granting of a contract to publish army recruitment advertisements to Kenny’s Advertising Agency on behalf of the British government. This episode appears to have caused a significant amount of discussion and controversy in various newspapers and publications of the day, and was also discussed by Laurence Ginnell MP during a debate in the British House of Commons.

Correspondence

Correspondence mainly relating to Kevin J Kenny’s work as an advertising agency and commercial manager for Kenny’s Advertising Agency and other publications.

Kenny, Kevin John

Frontline television programme on the sale of old national schools in the Beara Peninsula by St Brendan’s Trust.

Sub-series relates to an RTÉ Frontline television programme broadcast on 1 February 1980 that was researched and presented by Colum Kenny. The programme dealt with allegations that St Brendan’s Trust (the Kerry Diocesan Trust) had acquired 17 national school properties in the Beara Peninsula and sold them against the wishes of many in the local community. Prior to the Frontline programme being broadcast, the story was covered in Berehaven News, a newspaper published by Combat Poverty, a rural development group in the Beara Peninsula. A letter written by Kerry Diocesan Secretary and Social Policy Advisor (and Secretary of St Brendan’s Trust), Father Dermot Clifford condemning the Berehaven News article was also circulated to households in the Beara Peninsula area in January 1980.

After the Frontline programme aired, the Bishop of Kerry, Kevin McNamara and Father Clifford wrote (separately) to RTÉ Director General, George Waters to complain that Colum Kenny was “prejudiced in his approach” and “unfair” in an interview with Father Clifford. The complaint by Bishop McNamara, and the subsequent apologies made by Waters and RTÉ Chairman Patrick Moriarty to the Bishop were covered in several newspapers.

Father Clifford made an official complaint about the programme to the Broadcasting Complaints Commission in November 1980. The Commission rejected Father Clifford’s complaint in April 1981, and said the programme was not ‘a biased production’ and did not consider the interview unduly ‘harsh’.

This sub-series includes documents relating to the research for the programme and the production itself. Also includes letters and numerous newspaper cuttings relating to complaints made by Bishop McNamara and Father Clifford, and the subsequent decision of the Broadcasting Complaints Commission.

Much of the sub-series consists of copies of private correspondence written by various individuals relating to the complaint made by Father Clifford to the Broadcasting Complaints Commission in November 1980. This particular material is currently closed and access will be reviewed in 2025.

Government Notices

Public notices created by the British government, and subsequently Dáil Éireann, for advertising in newspapers and other publications.

Kenny’s Advertising Agency and Kenny Press

Sub-series consists of a pass to enable Kevin J Kenny to visit Kenny’s Advertising Agency at Middle Abbey Street after it had been destroyed during the 1916 Easter Rising; a photograph of the first Kenny’s Advertising Agency dance, and publications produced by the agency and Kenny Press.

Personal mementoes

Personal items and mementoes relating to significant events or causes in Kevin J Kenny’s life.

RTÉ [Raidió Teilifís Éireann] television Irish Hospitals’ Sweepstake television documentary.

Series relates to three RTÉ television documentaries that Colum Kenny worked on as a researcher and producer. One of the sub-series relates to a documentary titled ‘The Tailor and Ansty’, broadcast in October 1978, and includes numerous letters from Seán Ó Faoláin, Eric Cross, and Nancy McCarthy-Allitt.

The other two sub-series relate to a documentary on the Irish Hospitals’ Sweepstake and a Frontline television programme on the sale of old national schools in the Beara Peninsula respectively. The sub-series on the Irish Hospitals’ Sweepstake is currently closed for access, while part of the sub-series on the Frontline programme is currently closed.

The Tailor and Ansty: correspondence

Mainly consists of correspondence between Kenny and a number of individuals involved in a documentary researched and presented by Colum Kenny for RTÉ television about 'The Tailor and Ansty’ (husband and wife Timothy [‘the Tailor’] and Anastasia ['Ansty'] Buckley). The Tailor and Ansty were the subjects of a book by Eric Cross about their storytelling and home in Gougane Barra, County Cork, which became a hub for notable figures of the Cork arts scene in the 1930s and 1940s such as writers Frank O'Connor and Seán Ó Faoláin, sculptor Seamus Murphy, students of the Irish language, and folklorists. The book was published in 1942 and banned soon after. The RTÉ documentary included interviews with Cross, Ó Faoláin, and the Tailor and Ansty's close friend Nancy McCarthy-Allitt, and recounted the aftermath of the banning; including an episode when the Tailor was forced by three priests to burn a copy of the Eric Cross book in his fireplace. The documentary also included dramatised accounts of debates which took place in Seanad Éireann in December 1942 following the banning of the book. The RTÉ documentary was broadcast on 31 October 1978.